Veterinary Infection Control Made Easy

Veterinary Infection Control Made Easy

G9 Veterinary Cleaning & Hygiene Range

Joseph Lister’s 1860s application of carbolic acid to disinfect and sterilise surgical instruments, incisions and dressings laid the foundation of modern antiseptic surgery. G9 Veterinary Instrument, Hand and Surface Cleaners continue to provide an advanced response to the problem of animal-to-animal and animal-to-human infection.

Hygiene and Cleanliness In Veterinary Practice

Animals in a weakened or compromised state of health are susceptible to further infection. High levels of hygiene and cleanliness are vital to the safeguarding not only of other animals but also of humans working in or visiting a veterinary practice.

Poor or incomplete cleaning of surfaces, instruments and veterinary equipment can leave residual populations of infective agents. Having survived ineffective cleansing, residual agents may evolve an ongoing tolerance or even resistance to those cleaning regimes.

Cleanliness and Hygiene Is Fundamental To RCVS Accreditation

The UK Royal College of Veterinary Surgeon’s Core Standards requires veterinary practices to comply with ‘minimum standards of cleanliness and hygiene’ at all levels of accreditation.

General practices are expected to meet these standards and to keep their premises ‘clean and well maintained’. Veterinary Hospitals must achieve these standards and to submit to a rigorous examination of its facilities with emphasis on cleanliness and sterility.

Government bodies such as DEFRA, Local Authorities and organisations including the British Equine Federation further require their license holders and members to take all reasonable precautions to prevent and control the spread infectious diseases, pathogens and parasites among their animals and people.

Maintenance Of Hygiene And Cleanliness In Veterinary Facilities

Key to maintaining high standards of infection control, and to minimise the infection risk to animals and to humans, is the removal of the potential for the sharing or transfer of infected or infectious material.

Any residual organic material, including blood, mucous, tissue, urine and even hair has the potential to harbour and transfer pathogenic parasites, bacteria, viruses, fungi and viable spores.

Contaminated laboratory disposables can be easily removed from the veterinary environment and safely destroyed. Laboratory clothing may be disposable or decontaminated by specialist launderers. Surfaces such as treatment tables, and reusable equipment, however, generally require on-site decontamination.

Cleaning and Sterilisation of Laboratory and Surgery Surfaces

Standards for effective surface cleaning and sterilisation fluids are given by DEFRA in conformity with the Biocidal Products Directive (BPD) issued by The Health and Safety Executive (HSE). G9 Surface Disinfectant Cleaner meets the DEFRA ‘General Orders’ standard and accredited European Chemical Agency (ECHA) Veterinary test standards. Effective at an economical 1 in 100 dilution, G9 Surface Disinfectant Cleaner is proven against a broad spectrum of pathogens:

Bacteria: including Mycobacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureas, Enterococcus hirae, Proteus Vulgaris, MRSA, Escherichia coli, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Rhodococcus equi, Streptococcus equi, Acinetobacter baumanni.

Spores: including those of Bacillus subtilis and Clostridium difficile.

Viruses: including Bovine Enterovirus, Canine parvovirus, Feline calicivirus, Adenovirus 5, Murine norovirus.

Fungi and Yeast: including Aspergillus brasiliensis and Candida albicans.

G9 Alcohol Free Disinfectant Wipes

For convenience and speed of use, G9 Disinfectant Alcohol Free Wipes are proven effective in 30 seconds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E-coli, and against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger in 60 seconds. In addition, with a shelf life of 2 years, G9 Wipes are applicable to all medical, laboratory and veterinary areas including kennels, reception areas and surface disinfection of large equipment.

Hand Hygiene In Practices and Animal Facilities

Skin disinfection is essential for practitioners moving between animals, between animals and people or just between potentially infected environments.

G9 Chlorhexidine Hand Scrub and G9 Alcohol Hand Disinfectant Gels contain a unique blend of chlorhexidine digluconate effective against bacteria, yeast and micro-organisms. The inclusion of moisturisers prevent drying of the skin through frequent use and provide protection where the time available for hand cleansing and drying is limited.

Laboratory Equipment and Instrument Sterilisation

G9 Instrument Cleaners & Disinfectants effectively digest away proteinaceous and organic material including blood, mucus, faecal and vomited matter from the surface of instruments and endoscopes.

Suitable for use in soak baths, ultrasonic cleaning machines and automated processors, G9 Instrument Disinfectant contains no harmful glutaraldehyde, phenols, chlorine or peracetic acid and is 100% biodegradable.

G9 Veterinary Instrument, Hand and Surface Cleaners provide the reliable, comprehensive and economical solution to the potential risks of animal-to-animal and animal-to-human infection.

For further information visit our website www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or telephone us: 01798 874567

Cost Effective Canine Ovulation

Cost Effective Canine Ovulation

Test Kit Keeps Dog Breeders on TARGET

TARGET Canine Ovulation Timing Kit equips breeders with a simple, reliable test to predict the best time for mating or insemination maximising the efficiency of their facilities, and protecting the health of their breeding bitches.

Planned Pregnancies Enhance Breeding Health and Efficiency

Managing a healthy and efficient puppy breeding programme depends on the ability to find the time of mating or insemination most likely to result in pregnancy.

Planned pregnancies mean litters of pups can be timed to match resources and avoiding unwanted, wasteful pregnancies that might threaten a bitch’s breeding health.

Reliably Targetting the Best Breeding Dates

In the past, dog breeders have relied solely on the visible signs of a bitch’s readiness to breed. These physical indications are only an approximate indication of the best time for mating or insemination.

For today’s breeding kennels, the support of a more scientific and reliable method of predicting the best time to initiate breeding is available in the TARGET Canine Ovulation Timing Kit.

Rising Progesterone Indicates Breeding Readiness

By experience, breeders are familiar with the early signs of ‘coming into heat’ (oestrus) indicating that the bitch’s womb (uterus) is being prepared to receive and nurture her embryo pups.

Preparation of the womb lining (endometrium) is triggered by rising levels of the hormone progesterone in the bitch’s blood. Rising progesterone levels indicate that the bitch’s ovaries are primed and ready to release eggs (ovulation) for fertilisation by a male’s sperm from mating or insemination.

Supporting Breeders with Scientific Reliability

Testing for rising progesterone in blood serum, from a bitch showing early signs of heat, gives breeders a more certain prediction for ovulation, best dates mating and likely delivery of her litter.

The TARGET Canine Ovulation Timing Kit provides a simple, rapid, progesterone monitoring test to determine the days most likely to result in a successful mating or insemination.

Rapid and Reliable Colour Change Test

Serum samples for TARGET progesterone testing are simply prepared from a blood sample using a veterinary laboratory centrifuge. The whole testing procedure is completed on the kit’s convenient sample disc using the reagents supplied and in less than ten minutes.

The deep blue colour reaction, indicating little or no progesterone present, clearly distinguishes the negative result from the colourless positive response revealing the high hormone level necessary to successful, immediate mating.

Two Further Hormone Test Kits Help Breeders for Success

TARGET Canine Ovulation Test is one of three veterinary diagnostic test kits supporting vets, breeders and animal charities. FASTest LH monitors changing Luteinising Hormone (LH) levels as a further method of determining the best time to mate, while FASTest RELAXIN helps confirm that a bitch is pregnant or exclude a false or pseudo-pregnancy.

To find out more about this range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website www.vetlab supplies.co.uk or Telephone us: 01798 874567

Pregnancy Test for Dogs and Cats

Pregnancy Test for Dogs and Cats

Helping Breeders and Rescue Centres

For breeders, vets, animal charities and re-homing and rescue centres, knowing if a dog or cat is pregnant is a crucial question. FASTest RELAXIN provides the fast, simple and accurate answer.

Planned Pedigree Mating or Unknown History Rescue

For breeders with a planned breeding programme and concern for the health of their breeding females, reliable testing for a successful mating or insemination is essential.

For animal re-homing and rescue charities, the possibility that a new acquisition may be pregnant is a critical factor in the animal’s treatment and future prospects.

FASTest RELAXIN is an easy to use and simple to interpret diagnostic for an existing pregnancy, and a convenient indicator of pseudo-pregnancy (false pregnancy) and suspected spontaneous abortion.

Specific Indicator of Pregnancy in Dogs and Cats

The pregnancy hormone, relaxin is a specific indicator of pregnancy in dogs, cats and other carnivores. During pregnancy, Relaxin is produced within the ovaries, and by the placenta which sustains life in unborn pups and kittens.

Relaxin production begins as soon as a fertilised egg implants in the wall of the uterus (womb). Clinical tests show that relaxin can be detected in serum samples from week 4 of pregnancy in dogs, and from day 15 in cats.

Relaxin levels rise quickly during pregnancy and remain high throughout. A fall-off is a sign of abortion or reabsorption of an unviable foetus, although levels may be sustained for up to 14 days after a failed pregnancy.

Monitored Relaxin Levels Help Prepare for the Happy Event

The hormone relaxin helps the expectant mother to meet the extra demands of pregnancy; raising the heart’s capacity to circulate the blood and increasing the flow of blood through the kidneys.

Relaxin also relaxes the ligaments of the pelvis easing the passage of the newborn through the birth canal. Monitoring the rise in relaxin provides a means of timing when ovulation and fertilisation took place, and so helps estimate the arrival date of the resulting litter.

While relaxin levels may confirm a pregnancy, they do not indicate how many pups or kittens might be expected. Ultrasound or other visualisation techniques may be required to estimate the likely number and viability of new arrivals.

One of Three Test Kits Supporting Breeders and Charities

FASTest RELAXIN is one of three veterinary diagnostic test kits supporting vets, breeders animal charities and rescue centres. FASTest LH monitors changing Luteinising Hormone (LH) levels as a method of determining the best time to mate, as well as helping determine when the litter will arrive. TARGET Canine Ovulation Test further helps breeders plan pregnancies so that litters of pups can be timed to match resources, avoiding unwanted, unhealthy and wasteful pregnancies.

To find out more about this range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website  www.vetlab supplies.co.uk or Telephone us on 01798 874567

Dog Breeders Plan Litters With LH Hormone ‘Surge’ Test Kit

Dog Breeders Plan Litters With LH Hormone ‘Surge’ Test Kit

For dog breeders planning an efficient mating and rearing strategy, predicting the date of ovulation is a critical indicator of the ideal mating and likely date of whelping. Detecting the surge in Luteinizing Hormone (LH) equips vets and breeders to ascertain to date of ovulation.

LH Controls Ovulation Timing and Prepares For Pregnancy

Luteinizing Hormone (LH) is one of several important chemical messengers (hormones) produced by the pituitary gland, which sits just beneath the base of the brain.

When LH is released by the pituitary, it starts a chain reaction that ultimately results in the release of eggs (ovulation) from the ovaries into the fallopian tubes where fertilisation normally takes place. The fertilised eggs pass down the tubes to the uterus (womb) where they implant and develop into the growing foetus, nourished and fed via the placenta and umbilical cord.

LH also stimulates the formation of the corpus luteum. This is a structure that develops in the ovary after ovulation and produces the pregnancy-maintaining hormone progesterone. Progesterone prepares the lining of the womb (endometrium) for pregnancy, and acts on the pituitary to prevent further ovulation.

LH Surge: The Key Indicator of Ovulation In 36-48 Hours

For animals in the wild, a surge of LH production ensures that ovulation only occurs when there is the best chance of successful mating, and that subsequent offspring will have the best chance of survival in the womb, and of reaching maturity themselves.

This surge of LH production is a key indicator of when ovulation is likely to occur. Reliably detecting the LH surge allows dog breeders to not only arrange the time of mating or insemination, but also estimate the likely arrival date of litters.

Infertile bitches, the LH surge is followed by ovulation 36-48 hours later. Typically, the ideal time to mate a bitch and achieve the best chance of fertilisation is 4 to 6 days after the LH peak.

Fast Colour Change Test Detects LH Peak in Bitches

FASTest LH is the simple and reliable on-site test for predicting the time of ovulation, mating, artificial inseminating and likely birth date. This 20 minute, colour-change test detects the Luteinising Hormone (LH) peak in the serum and plasma of dogs. This test is also applicable to cats.

Starting 4 to 5 days before the likely start of the oestrus cycle, testing at 12 to 24-hour intervals will show negative LH results up to the LH surge. Possible positive results are re-tested after 2 hours. If the second test is positive, and a follow-up 24-hour test is also positive, then peak LH production is indicated.

Trio of Test Kits Help Vets and Breeders Plan with Success

FASTest LH completes a trio of veterinary diagnostic test kits supporting vets, breeders, and animal charities. TARGET Canine Ovulation Test measures progesterone levels as a further method of determining the best time to mate, while FASTest RELAXIN helps confirm that a bitch is pregnant or exclude a false or pseudopregnancy.

Visit our website for information about our  veterinary diagnostic test kits or Telephone: 01798874567

 

Simple D.Immitis Test Key To Early Heartworm Diagnosis

Simple D.Immitis Test Key To Early Heartworm Diagnosis

Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is a seriously debilitating disease of dogs throughout southern Europe, Southeast Asia, the Middle East and South America. Though not yet established in the UK, climate changes and the presence of mosquitoes capable of transmitting the parasite highlights the benefits a simple and reliable D.immitis diagnostic test with real-world practicality.

What Is Dog Heartworm?

Heartworm, or Dirofilaria immitis, is a thread-like parasitic worm that infects the heart, lungs and blood vessels of wild and domestic dog species as well as ferrets, bears, seals, sea lions and, more rarely, cats and humans.  Heartworms form a congestive mass in the heart of an infected animal severely restricted the circulation of blood through the lungs and around the body.

Dogs suffering from heartworm infestation can show symptoms including weight loss or anorexia, a soft but persistent cough, lethargy or a reluctance to exercise, rapid or difficult breathing, decreased appetite, swelling around the chest or abdomen and – in the worst cases – sudden collapse and even death.

Changing-up: The Risk of Heartworm In The UK

Heartworm is a ‘vector-borne’ parasite transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. Immature D.immitis larvae are injected, by mosquito bite, into the bloodstream of a domestic or wild population dog. With hundreds of others, they grow into adult heartworm forming a tangled, congestive mass in the dog’s blood vessels, organs and heart. Mating, they produce more larvae which are taken up by a feeding mosquito to continue the cycle of infection.

Vector-borne diseases require a ‘perfect triangle’ of hosts, vectors and a transmissible parasite. The UK already has a population of dog hosts and the mosquitoes capable of carrying the infective larvae, though a cool climate keeps the mosquito population low. Increased foreign travel under the Pet Travel Scheme (PETS), together with illegal dog imports heightens the risk of dogs arriving in the UK with a D.immitis infection. Climate change is likely to increase the numbers, lifespan and spread of the home mosquito population.

Early Detection of Heartworm Is The Key To The Cure

Dogs suffering from heartworm can be treated with a combined regime of medication and rest. Some degree of preventative treatment may also be available for dogs travelling to areas where D.immitis infection is more common. Your veterinary surgeon will be able to advise on the best course of action for you and your dog.

Where infection by, or exposure to, heartworm-carrying mosquitoes is suspected an immediate visit to your vet is essential. Vets and veterinary laboratories are equipped to carry out a range of procedures, including X-ray, ultrasound, ECG and highly specific veterinary diagnostic tests to detect clinical and early-stage signs of heartworm infection.

FASTest Heartworm Ag is a simple, 15-minute test for detecting specific Dirofilaria immitis markers (antigens) in whole blood, plasma or serum from dogs thought to have been exposed to infected mosquitoes. Test data shows the clear, colour-change test to be 98.6 % sensitive and 99.1% specific. Storage at room temperature (15-25° C) and long shelf life makes the all-in-one test kit a practical and economical veterinary field and laboratory diagnostic test.

Visit our website to see our full range of Veterinary Products www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or contact us on 01798 874567.

Clinical vs Mycological: Cure of Microsporum Canis after pulse therapy with itraconazole

Clinical vs Mycological: Cure of Microsporum Canis after pulse therapy with itraconazole

Antibiotics have become the treatment of choice for many if not most bacterially mediated medical conditions. Antibiotic treatments are traditionally based on maintaining the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the active agent in vitro. However, the key to the effective application of antibiotics, and other bio-active medication is combining the optimal dosage with the optimal re-dosing time interval.

Dosing Regimens

Experimental research has compared phased dosing regimens to those that work by maintaining a constant level of the active agent. Results showed that effective treatment was possible – even enhanced – when drug concentrations were not retained above the MIC over the entire treatment period. Further studies demonstrated that prolonged periods of dose suspension, interspersed between administered doses, could produce temporarily higher in vitro drug concentrations resulting in more rapid destruction of the target bacterial, fungal or other invading cells. Further, with antibiotics, the decrease in antibiotic concentration between doses could produce a ‘post-antibiotic’ effect which might help slow the worrying increase in antibiotic resistance.

Microsporum Canis After Pulse Therapy

Treatments using this so-called ‘pulse therapy’ has proved effective not only in the application of antibiotic therapies but also with medications relying on more conventional drug types. Research published in the October 2018 edition of Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery describes the results of treating Microsporum Canis infection in cats using a regime of alternating ‘one week on one week off’ applications of itraconazole.

Microsporum Canis is a feline dermatophytosis contagious via direct contact with material from other infected animals. Triazoles, such as Itraconazole, are cyclic carbon-nitrogen molecules known to be potent antifungal agents thanks to their inhibiting of the synthesis of ergosterol, a vital component of fungal cell membranes.

The work of Christopher Puls et al working at Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, Indiana and published in the Journal showed that orally administered itraconazole in such a ‘pulsed-dose’ therapy ‘produced a clinical cure and facilitated and reduced the time to mycological cure compared with untreated controls’.

Interestingly, the authors reported that ‘Similar to previous studies, clinical cure [97.5% after 9 weeks – assessed using a Woods lamp] in the current study was achieved earlier and cure rates were greater than mycological cure rate [60% after 9 weeks], suggesting that clinical cure will often precede mycological cure’.

Detecting the possible presence of subclinical Microsporum infection requires a sensitive and reliable test that can be performed on the widest range of appropriate source material including hair roots, dandruff, scabs and skin scrapings. Vetlab Supplies is one specialist who offers Mykodermo Assay Trio, which is an innovative diagnostic test simplifying the detection of the most clinically significant dermatophytosis: Microsporum spp (M.canis, M.gypseum, M.pesicolor), Trichophyton spp (T.verrucosum, T.menta grophytes) and Epidermophyton spp.

You Say Leishmaniosis, I Say Leishmaniasis…

You Say Leishmaniosis, I Say Leishmaniasis…

Diagnosis and Testing

Although the terms are often used interchangeably, they do have subtlety different meanings in medical and veterinary terminology. Whichever term you choose, global travel and climate change is likely to increase the demand for Leishmania diagnostic testing.

Canine Hosted Parasite With the Zoonotic Risk to Humans

Leishmaniasis usually refers to the abnormal conditions or characteristics caused by infection with the Leishmania infantum protozoan in humans. Leishmaniosis, on the other hand, is more often used to describe the disease process caused by the presence of this intracellular parasite in its primary host, the dog. However, in general use, the terms seem interchangeable.

Named to honour Scottish pathologist and Director of Army Medical Services, William Boog Leishman, the parasite is spread principally through bites from species of blood-sucking Phlebotominae mosquitoes generally known as sandflies. According to Leishvet.org, dogs and cats infected with Leismania.spp can exhibit a range of symptoms affecting their digestive, cutaneous, ocular, circulatory and nervous systems.

Enlarged Lymph Nodes and Skin Lesions May Aid Diagnosis

Most dogs carrying the parasite show no clinical symptoms and may live for many years before becoming obviously sick. As the clinical disease is almost always fatal, accurate and rapid diagnosis of leishmaniosis in dogs is critical whenever an infection is suspected.

Knowledge of an animal’s travel history can be a key factor in helping vets to diagnose a suspected case of leishmaniosis. Dogs showing enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenomegaly) and skin lesions, with a history of travel to the Mediterranean or Africa and South America, may be prime candidates for diagnostic testing for Leishmania.

Vaccination, Insecticides and Fly Repellent Collars

Preventing infection in the first place is always the best course of action. Protective collars, repellent to fleas and ticks as well as sandflies, reduce the chance of the dog being bitten by the disease’s insect vector. Insecticides too, applied to areas of bare skin, protect those parts of a dog most vulnerable to sandfly predation.

Although there is currently no vaccine against the risk of Leishmania infection, a vaccine to strengthen the Leishmania immune response has been licensed for use in dogs since 2011. Owners of dogs intending to travel with their animals into Leishmania.spp endemic areas would be advised to consult their vets well in advance of their journey.

Rapid, Reliable Diagnostic Testing for L.infantum Antigens

Because of the disease’s long asymptomatic period, it is recommended that well-travelled pets should be tested for pre-existing infection, especially before any vaccine is administered or further travel considered. FASTest Leish is the long shelf-life, simple colour-change test giving clear-cut antibody mediated results in 15 minutes.

Visit our website to see our full range of Veterinary Products www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or contact us on 01798 874567.

No Deal Brexit?

No Deal Brexit?

Challenge Or Opportunity for Official Vets

A no-deal Brexit will take the UK out of EU animal welfare legislation. Maintaining animal welfare standards at the UK border will increase the workload of Official Vets in Border Inspection Posts, abattoirs and in veterinary laboratories. Training and deploying the necessary vets and support personnel will be a challenge to animal welfare and an opportunity for the veterinary profession.

EU Animal Welfare and UK Law

The welfare of animals traded within the EU is covered in Article 13 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). This document recognises in law the sentient nature of wild, commercial and companion animals. EU member states are legally bound to respect the welfare of animals in agriculture, fisheries, transport, laboratory research, development, and even space travel.

Animals brought into the EU, including the UK, must be checked and certified to EU standards. These standards are enforced at approved Veterinary Border Inspection Posts (BIPs). In the UK, the key personnel at these veterinary BIPS are the government authorised Official Vets (OVs).

Official Vets Crucial To Cross-border Animal Welfare

DEFRA defines an OV as a private practice vet who works on behalf of an EU member state. British OVs work on behalf of the UK’s Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) monitoring compliance with a range of animal and public health regulations including commercial animal export certification and the Pet Travel Scheme (PETS).

Official Vets are in high demand, not only at BIPS, but in abattoirs, veterinary testing laboratories and other establishments where animal welfare and public health is a significant concern. Until 2011, the role of Official Vet was listed on the UK’s Shortage Occupation List, meaning that candidates could be sought from countries outside of the UK and EU.

Shortfall In Veterinary Professionals Risk To Animal Welfare

A no-deal Brexit will leave the UK outside of the TFEU welfare standards. Animals traded across UK-EU and UK-worldwide borders will require Export Health Certificates (EHC) signed by Official Vets. Chief Veterinary Officer, Christine Middlemiss, estimated that this extra work will require an increase of 225% in the number of OVs.

Removal of roles such as veterinary surgeon and veterinary laboratory scientist from the UK Shortage Occupation list means that veterinary recruitment is restricted by government immigration policy. A Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) survey showed a significant number of veterinary staff originated in the EU. The survey concluded that “…the UK veterinary profession will suffer considerably if European veterinary surgeons, and to a lesser extent European veterinary nurses, are no longer welcome here…”

RCVS findings are reinforced by the 2015 British Veterinary Association (BVA) survey which showed that 40% of UK veterinary practices took over 3 months to recruit professional staff or were forced to withdraw their vacancy altogether. A further 2018 BVA survey also showed a shortfall of 11.5% in vets and 7.6% vet nurses.

Opportunity and Challenge Of A No-deal Brexit

The UK traditionally aspires to the highest welfare standards in traded animals. Separation from European regulations could create the freedom to set new and higher welfare standards in the movement of commercial, companion and wild animals worldwide.

However, increased trade among countries with lower standards, apparently promising cheaper food imports, may drive UK farmers to resist higher standards and even press for less regulation. Whatever standards are adopted post-Brexit, the number of vets and vet professionals needed to monitor and maintain those standards in BIPs, abattoirs and veterinary laboratories is almost certain to increase. Meeting that need will be a challenge and an opportunity for the whole veterinary profession.

Visit our website www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk and see our full range of veterinary equipment and consumables.

StreetVet Homeless Pets Charity

StreetVet Homeless Pets Charity

Officially Registered

Registered with the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) and now an officially listed Registered Charity, StreetVet provides a comprehensive ‘out on the streets’ veterinary diagnostics, treatment, welfare and owner education service for the pets of Britain’s homeless.

StreetVet: How It All Began

StreetVet began with just two vets out on the streets of London back in 2016. Armed with only what veterinary supplies and equipment could be fitted into a backpack, ‎Jade Statt and Sam Joseph set out to honour the bond of loyalty they had witnessed between one homeless man and his dog.

Back then, Gary Spall, with his staffie-cross Lola, was among the homeless still to be found on the streets around Covent Garden, London. Lola, a rescue dog from Battersea Dogs & Cats Home shared every moment of Gary’s street life, building a mutual bond of loyalty and dependence. Gary attributed his survival through the worst of times to Lola, telling news reporters: “I don’t know what I’d do without her… It’d break me if I ever lost her.”

Homeless Pets: A Reason to Keep On Keeping On

As with Gary, a pet on the streets provides more than simply companionship for many homeless. A dog or, less usually, a cat or other animal provides a focus for living and a reason just to keep on going. Unfortunately, loved as they are, street pets can find themselves excluded from the professional veterinary healthcare, diagnosis and treatment expected for homed pets. A particular worry for the homeless is who will look after their pet if and when a stay in hospital becomes unavoidable.

StreetVet, now with 300 volunteers on its books, and supported by animal charity Blue Cross, also links homeless pet owners into the charity StreetKitchen with support for their owners too. Owner education is one of the key service points that StreetVet offers, giving owners the vital information they need to understand the particular health risks to pets of a life on the streets.

Continuing Care: Vaccinations and Follow-ups

Emergency care, veterinary diagnosis and treatment is only part of the animal charity’s work with Britain’s homeless pets. Just as with any pet and owner fortunate enough to a have a roof over their heads, regular health checks, vaccinations and follow-up appointments are all part of assuring a pet’s continuing well being even after the crisis has passed.

Now an officially registered charity, StreetVet operates in Brighton, Bristol, Cambridge, Plymouth, Birmingham, Cheltenham, Southampton as well as in London and Cornwall. In their first year and a half, over 200 street dogs were vaccinated, microchipped (now a legal requirement), treated for fleas and medicated against parasites such as lungworm. Other pets were prescribed pain relief and some even received surgery.

Veterinary and Public Support: Vital for Pet Charities

As with all charities helping people or pets, StreetVet and Blue Cross are dependent on the generosity of the public, veterinary professionals and specialists in veterinary supplies and equipment. Vetlab supplies helps support animal charities through preferential relationships in the supply of veterinary laboratory equipment, laboratory consumables and diagnostic test kits.

Contact us about our Charity Discounts! Telephone: 01798 874567 and we will be delighted to help you.

Giardiasis Symptoms Explained

Giardiasis Symptoms Explained

Diagnosis Needs This Test

New research reveals how the Giardia parasite causes intestinal tissue damage that allows other pathogens to flourish. However, the symptoms of giardiasis in animals (and humans) are not necessarily confirmatory. For vets, monoclonal antibody-mediated diagnostic Giardia test kits provide rapid, accurate detection both the active disease (trophozoite) and the carrier state (cyst).

The Giardia Parasite is One of Animal Health’s Oldest Enemies

The flagellated protozoan responsible for giardiasis is among the first microorganisms to be visually recognised by early day microbiologists. The motile, trophozoite, form of the Giardia parasite was first observed in 1681 by pioneer microscopist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek from stools of his own diarrhoea.

Named in 1882 to honour of Professor Alfred Mathieu Giard, the genus includes G.lamblia (also known as G.intestinalis and G.duodenalis) infecting humans and other mammals, together with G.ardeae and G.psittaci specific to birds, G.agilis to amphibians, and G.microti to voles.

Giardia Poses a Zoonotic Infection Risk to Human Health

Giardia parasites represent a zoonotic risk, meaning that the infection can spread from animals to humans. In May 2018, Public Health England reported increasing Giardia infection in England and Wales from just over 3,600 cases in 2013 to almost 4,500 thousand in 2016.

The report largely attributed the rise in observed infection rates to the increased use of immunological diagnostic methods. The effectiveness of such methodology underlines the case for the specific monoclonal antibody-based techniques of Giardia.spp diagnostic testing.

Symptoms Alone May Not Be Diagnostic of Giardiasis

In January 2018, researchers at the University of East Anglia uncovered the pathology underlying the symptoms of Giardiasis. Published in the journal Gigascience, UEA scientists describe how the active parasite produces ‘copy-cat’ human Tenascin proteins.

Tenascins balance the need for cells to stick together or break apart during tissue repair and wound healing. Excess Tenascins, due to Giardia infection, upset this balance causing the cells that line the intestine to break apart and release nutrients, which other gut bacteria exploit as food.

The waste and toxins produced by these other organisms cause symptoms including diarrhoea, flatulence, light stools, abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration; symptoms in common with other mammalian diseases and infections.

Giardia Diagnostic Testing Relies on Monoclonal Antibodies

Spread through faeces contaminated water, and a particular danger to young, infirm and immunologically challenged animals, diagnosing Giardiasis requires accurate diagnostic testing as well as expert recognition of symptoms.

FASTest Giardia Strip is instantly ready for use and stores at room temperature for up to 18 months. Precise and specific monoclonal antibodies detect both the trophozoite and cyst antigen to provide a clear-cut diagnosis in minutes through a simple 2-step process.

For further information about the FASTest Giardia Veterinary Kit: Contact Vetlab Supplies on 01798 874567 or visit our website www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk

COVID-19 Update

As the impact of COVID-19, is being felt around the world, the well-being of our employees and their families is of the highest importance to us.

By putting the safety of our employees first, we have reduced our on-site staff to a minimum and we will endeavour to maintain our business operations to the highest standard possible.

We are carefully monitoring and following official guidance from the UK Government, Public Health England, WHO and CDC guidelines and in line with these; we are currently operating business as usual.

We are monitoring our stock levels on a daily basis ensuring a fair distribution of our products. We are fully committed to maintaining the supply of products during these unprecedented times.

We are open for orders from Monday through to Thursday and closing on Fridays:

Friday Closure:  For any technical queries, orders or enquiries please do one of the following:
• Email: info@vetlabsupplies.co.uk.
• Fax: 01798 874787
• Telephone & leave a message: 01798 874567

We will endeavour to contact you on Friday and Monday if it is non-urgent.

If you require any further information, please contact Vetlab Supplies Ltd Customer Services on 01798 874567 or email info@vetlabsupplies.co.uk.

Thank you to all our customers and suppliers for their support during these temporary measures.

Stay Safe