Ticking Off

Ticking Off

Still The Best Protection Against ‘Tracker Dog Disease’ Ehrlichiosis

Environmental change is exposing Britain’s dogs to more and more diseases once confined to warmer Mediterranean and tropical climes. Diseases spread by ‘vectors’ including fleas, mites and ticks pose a special risk. One such disease, Canine Ehrlichiosis, is of growing concern to UK vets and dog owners.

Tracker Dog Disease

Called ‘tracker dog disease’ and tropical pancytopenia in the US, due to its infection of military dogs serving in Vietnam, Canine Ehrlichiosis is also known as canine rickettsiosis or canine haemorrhagic fever. The infection spreads from dog to dog in the saliva of bites from the nymphs of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

Acute symptoms of the disease include; fever, anorexia, depression, with longer-term chronic symptoms such as anaemia, weight loss, depression, petechiae, pale mucous membranes and oedema. In the most severe cases, infected dogs may die from massive haemorrhaging, severe debilitation or secondary infections. Some infected dogs show no clinical signs and remain as carriers for many years, but may suddenly develop chronic symptoms.

What Causes the Symptoms?

Canine Ehrlichiosis symptoms may be caused by infection with one of a number of Ehrlichia spp. pathogens including Ehrlichia canis. E. canis is widespread in the warmer parts of many countries including France, Greece, Spain and Italy. In 2013 a Tibetan Terrier in London with no history of foreign travel outside of the UK, or known contact with travelled dogs, was diagnosed with E.canis.

The pathogenic agent of Ehrlichiosis is an intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that penetrates and destroys white blood cells. Ehrlichia bacteria are similar to other pathogenic invaders including Rickettsiacea and Anaplasma spp.

In the last few decades, interest in Ehrlichioses has spread beyond the veterinary profession. In 1986, the first diagnosis of the condition in a human patient indicated Ehrlichia’s zoonotic potential and risk to human health.

MegaCor FASTest Ehrlichia canis is a is a rapid immunochromatographic screening test for antibodies produced in response to Ehrlichia canis infection. As with other kits in the FASTest veterinary diagnostic range, the all-in-one test kit is simple to use, responds positively with a quick, clear-cut colour-change with a shelf life of up to 24 months even at room temperature storage.

Warm Weather and Parasite Activity

Although there are no current vaccines against Ehrlichia infections, most dogs recover from the acute and subclinical phases. With the approach of warmer weather and increasing parasite activity, preventing canine ehrlichiosis, and other tick-borne diseases including Lymes disease and Borrelia burgdorferi, will best be achieved by avoiding exposure to the tick vector. Your vet will be able to advise on the most suitable tick preventative measures for your dog and lifestyle.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Why Some Mice Just Want to Be Caught

Why Some Mice Just Want to Be Caught

How Toxoplasma Makes Infection More Likely

Toxoplasmosis in cats is caused by infection with the single-celled organism Toxoplasma gondii. Manifesting itself in symptoms including anorexia, weight loss, lethargy, vomiting, jaundice and difficulty breathing, infection is diagnosed by the detection of T.gondii IgG antibodies.

The Parasite That Plays Cat and Mouse

Passed from the cat in its faeces, the eggs (oocysts) of T.gondii are inadvertently ingested by a ‘secondary host’ – such as a rat or mouse, ‘hatching’ to form large numbers of cysts in the animal’s muscle and nervous tissues. To complete its life-cycle, the immature parasite must get back into the primary host. This can only happen if the hapless secondary carrier is caught and eaten by a predatory cat.

Natural selection has equipped rodents with an acute sense of smell and the behavioural response to avoid anything that smells of cat. Current research indicates that the Toxoplasma parasite actually stacks the odds of survival against its secondary host and in favour of the cat getting its dinner – and re-infection with toxoplasmosis.

T.gondii Infected Mice Lose Their Fear of Cats

Controlled tests indicate that laboratory-bred rodents infected with Toxoplasma gondii can lose their fear of cats. Tests have shown that this response isn’t simply a reduction in sensitivity to the smell of cats, the parasite is apparently modifying the rodent’s behaviour increases the likelihood of its getting found, caught and eaten.

Rather than running from its nemesis, behavioural scientists have witnessed T.gondii infected animals courting disaster by cavorting in the presence of cat urine, rather than heading for the safety of the nearest hole.

The Fine Art of Behavioural Manipulation

Research shows that there is a careful balance. Although the infected rodents show a reduced fear of weak cat-urine smells, stronger smells override their faux courage allowing their instinct for self-preservation to take over. This finding suggests the parasite itself has evolved to exert just the right level of behavioural manipulation over its unfortunate secondary host.

Diagnostic Testing Protects Unborn Kittens from Toxoplasmosis

The animal welfare issue of Toxoplasma infection in cats is magnified in cat breeding centres and catteries. T.gondii not only infects adult cats, but it can also infect unborn kittens while still in the womb. Infected kittens may be stillborn or die even before weaning; survivors may be seriously weakened, show a lack of appetite, fever, dyspnoea or jaundice.

FASTest Toxoplasma-g provides vets serving catteries and cat breeders with a reliable veterinary diagnostic test for Toxoplasma gondii. Ready for instant use, the easy to use test kit stores at room temperature and gives a clear cut immunochromatographic response in 15 minutes.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Diagnostic Testing for Koi Herpes Virus

Diagnostic Testing for Koi Herpes Virus

Protecting Valuable Koi Stocks

Koi Herpes Virus (KHV) is a distressing and deadly disease of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and all its wild and ornamental varieties including mirror, leather, ghost and koi.

Within a carp stocked water, the disease is spread through fish to fish contact. However, poorly disinfected fishing tackle, fishery management equipment and even contaminated water, can transfer the virus between unconnected carp habitats.

Visual and Behavioural Changes

KHV infection shows itself as patches of white or brown dead tissue on the fish’s gills. Skin elsewhere on the fish might appear rough and flaking. A loss of protective mucus makes virus-infected carp feel dry when handled. Behavioural changes can include lethargy and hanging still in the water. KHV damage to a fish’s gills makes getting enough oxygen from the water stressful, so KHV affected fish may gather near aeration points such as inlets or fountains. Tissue damage leaves koi carp vulnerable to secondary invasion by parasitic fungi and bacteria.

As spring approaches, and water temperatures rise toward the virus’s activating temperature of 16-degree centigrade, carp fisheries and ornamental stocks – including mirror carp, leather carp, koi and ghost koi, risk large-scale mortalities of up to 100%.

Halting the movement of Infectious Stock 

The Fish Health Inspectorate (FHI), Part A of the UK Government’s Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture (Cefas) requires notification whenever KHV is suspected in carp stocked waters. In response, the FHI may temporarily suspend access to the affected water and halt the movement of potentially infectious stocks and equipment. After mortalities have ceased, FHI may prohibit restocking with carp species until after the following summer. This is to ensure that seasonally warming water doesn’t provoke a renewed outbreak. Even so, there is no guarantee that replacement stock won’t pick up an infection from surviving fish.

There is no treatment or cure for KHV, and because the virus may persist in fish surviving any outbreak of the virus, only careful biosecurity-management and constant monitoring offer any protection against potentially devastating infection.

FASTest Koi HV is a 15-minute pond-side test giving a clear colour-change signal if Koi Herpes Virus is detected. Based on specific monoclonal antibody technology, the long shelf life kit requires no refrigerated storage.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Why Springtime is The Big Time for Ticks

Why Springtime is The Big Time for Ticks

It’s Not the Blood They Suck, It’s What They Leave Behind

Ticks are an unpleasant experience for dogs and people. Unlikely to cause lasting harm in themselves, the diseases and infections they carry, however, are another more serious story. FASTest Lyme and FASTest Bor-In-Tick help vets in the fight against Tick-Borne Diseases.

Cold Blooded Parasite Seeks Warm Blooded Host

Having no way to regulate their body heat, ticks are not normally inactive through the winter but begin actively feeding in the spring and early summer. In the heat summer, some species of tick reduce their parasitism greatly, though ticks often reach a second peak of activity in the autumn.

Most likely to sink its jaws into your dog is the sheep tick (Ixodes ricinus), although ticks more commonly found on hedgehogs, (Ixodes hexagonus) or hosted by foxes and badgers (Ixodes canisuga), might also help themselves to a blood meal from you or your canine companion.

Picture of sheep Tick
Sheep Tick

The Three Blood-Sucking Stages of a Tick’s Life

Ticks have a 3-stage life cycle. Depending on the species of tick, each stage might feed on a different host or take a repeat meal from the same species type.

After hatching from over-wintering eggs, the six-legged tick larvae climb plant stems to hitch a lift and scrounge a blood-meal from a passing warm-blooded animal.

Suitably fed, the larvae releases its grip and falls to the ground where it grows, moults and develops into its second, immature form as an 8-legged nymph. The nymph stage repeats the behaviour of its younger self, again feeding and dropping off into the warm moist undergrowth where it matures into its hard coated, 8-legged adult form.

After mating, the adult female tick climbs out of the undergrowth one final time to suck the blood that will nourish her eggs before dropping back to earth to lay the eggs that will lie dormant and hatch out in the following spring.

In-Tick Test Puts Vets One Step Ahead of Borrelia-Lymes

Heavy infestations of ticks can take enough blood from their hosts to cause anaemia, and the wound caused by a tick bite can become infected, especially if its mouthparts remain embedded in the skin. The most serious potential for sickness and even death from tick bites comes from their role as vectors for blood-borne parasites. Perhaps the highest profile Tick-Borne Disease (TDB) is Lymes Disease caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi.

Lymes disease, in a blood sample from a suspected infection, is rapidly and reliably diagnosed with the FASTest Lyme diagnostic kit. Now, with FASTest Bor-in-Tick, Vets can test for B.burgdorferi in ticks found on animals or in their environment, putting vets and their clients one step ahead of a potential Lyme Borrelia outbreak.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Survey of Horses and Owners Shows Importance of FEC Monitoring

Survey of Horses and Owners Shows Importance of FEC Monitoring

A survey of horse owners at the 2017 Royal Welsh Show found that better awareness of routine faecal egg counting (FEC) in horses could reduce the need for veterinary treatment.

The UK’s county-based agricultural shows are an ideal opportunity for producers, consumers and their suppliers to gather and exchange information toward the improvement animal husbandry, health and welfare.

Unique opportunity to gather information

The Royal Welsh Show, held each July at the Llanelwedd showground in Builth Wells, Powys is among the largest of the county agricultural shows both in the UK and in Europe. The gathering of so many from so far afield provides veterinary laboratory researchers with a unique opportunity to gather real-world information from a wide range of animals and their owners.

At the 2017 Royal Welsh Show, researchers from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwyth collected faecal samples from 60 horses taking part in the four-day event. Using a commercial faecal egg flotation system they recorded the number of nematode eggs per gram (epg) of faecal matter, and related their findings to monitoring and treatment details supplied by horse owners.

Faecal egg counting in horses at the show revealed detectable nematode infection in 30 (50%) of tests. Almost a third (27%) were scored above the 200 epg baseline generally considered as requiring anti-parasite treatment. Questioning the owners and keepers revealed that, on average, horses received 3 anthelmintic treatments per year, though some received none, and others as many as 6.

18% of owners confessed to irregular FEC testing

Asked about the frequency of faecal egg count analysis, almost a fifth (18%) of owners confessed to irregular and infrequent testing, while only two of the sixty reported a routine approach with repeat testing every eight weeks. The value of FEC monitoring was reflected in the fact that only two of the regularly tested horses returned egg counts above the 200 epg threshold.

Overall, the average egg count of untested horses was more than four times that of animals whose owners committed to routine faecal egg monitoring. The benefit of regular FEC testing was further proven by the researchers’ observation that horses not subject to routine FEC analysis were more than 150 per cent more likely to require veterinary treatment.

While the survey strongly suggests that owners are not over-medicating their horses, it also indicates a low level of FEC monitoring in the wider horse-owning community. Researchers from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences hope that the Royal Welsh Show findings will highlight the crucial role of routine faecal egg counting in horses in equine health and welfare management.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary products visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Paramphistomiasis In The UK – Accurate Egg Counting Is No Fluke

Paramphistomiasis In The UK – Accurate Egg Counting Is No Fluke

Paramphistomiasis, or rumen fluke, is of increasing interest as a parasitic disease of livestock producing a range of non-specific symptoms including diarrhoea, weight loss and general weakening.

Paramphistomes are two-host trematode parasites that spread their lifecycle between mammals and molluscs. Grazing on infected snail material introduces parasite cysts into a ruminant’s digestive system where hatched-out flukes feed before heading up into the rumen. Here they attach to the rumen wall and feed on its contents like a mass of pink maggots. Resistant eggs (oocytes) pass through the gut and out with the host’s faeces. Taken into roving snails, the oocysts hatch and reproduce to complete the life cycle.

Observed in British livestock as far back as the 1950s

Rumen thrives in the warm moist tropical climate with little significant impact on livestock economics. More recently, the organism has become increasingly common in temperate climes infected an estimated 20% to 30% of European livestock. Recent studies report the parasite as present in up to 77% of sheep in Ireland with prevalence across the UK varying between 29% and 52%.
Observed in British livestock as far back as the 1950s, the prominent paramphistome species identified in the UK is Calicophoron daubneyi. Since the late 2000s, the trematode’s eggs have started appearing in routine Veterinary Investigation Diagnosis Analysis (VIDA) examinations.

Detecting the heavier eggs

Rumen fluke eggs are relatively heavy, compared to the oocysts of most intestinal parasites. Consequently, centrifugation using flotation solutions and convenient recovery systems such as Ovatube are not efficient in the detection of rumen fluke oocysts in animal faeces. Veterinary laboratories generally employ ‘sedimentation’ rather than ‘flotation’ techniques to detect the heavier eggs of trematode flukes.

In sedimentation, a small sample of faeces is thoroughly suspended in water and the bulk of solid material removed using a coarse metal or cloth strainer. Left to settle, the sediment from the filtrate is then re-suspended in clean water. Adding a drop of methylene blue or malachite green to the recovered solid material from this suspension will clearly stain remaining faecal material blue or green, leaving parasite eggs unstained.

Diagnosis and control of this new invader

A veterinary microscope equipped with 10x eyepieces and a 10x objective allows identification of Paramphistomum and other relatively heavy parasite oocysts including Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke). Using a McMaster Worm Egg Counting Slide, to relate the number of eggs found to the number of faeces sampled, allows a quantitative assessment of the level of parasite infection.

The likely economic impact of the spread of rumen fluke is as yet uncertain. Fortunately, because its eggs can be detected during examinations for liver fluke in faecal samples, and its similar life cycle, veterinary laboratories are forewarned and forearmed in the diagnosis and control of this new invader.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary products visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Slugs and Snails and Puppy-dog’s Ailments – The Rise in Canine Lungworm

Slugs and Snails and Puppy-dog’s Ailments – The Rise in Canine Lungworm

As its alternative name suggests, the lungworm parasite was not always a disease common among cats and dogs in the UK. The first case of ‘French Heartworm’ appeared in 1975.  In the 40 years since, the parasite has established hotspots in the UK’s more southerly counties, with cases reported as far north as Paisley in Scotland.

UK veterinary laboratories reported more than 80 cases of lungworm, including 6 fatalities in the first half of 2017. Infection with the nematode worm species, Angiostrongylus vasorum, has many symptoms including coughing and shortness of breath, an aversion to exercise, weight loss, vomiting, abdominal and back pain, nervous disorders, unusual bleeding, heart failure, and sudden death.

The life cycle of A.vasorum makes it difficult to eradicate. The adult parasite lives in the small arteries of the lungs and in the right-side heart chambers producing eggs that hatch into larvae.  Larvae penetrate into the lungs and make their way into the back of the throat where they are swallowed to enter the animal’s digestive system.  Finally, the lungworm larvae are passed out with animal’s faeces.

Slugs, snails and even frogs are the usual suspects

Slugs, snails and even frogs are the usual suspects in the spread of lungworm, though exactly how is not altogether clear. The established theory is that the larger slug species, which will eat dog and fox faeces, become intermediate hosts for the maturing lungworm larvae. When domestic cats and dogs eat infected molluscs, anything else that ate them, or lick infected slug and snail slime off their paws, the cycle of infection is complete.

Research estimates the presence of lungworm in UK foxes has risen from about 7% in 2008 to just over 18% today. The highest incidence is in the south-east where up to 50% of foxes are thought to be infected.  This might not be entirely the foxes’ fault.  A high urban fox population – feeding on readily available discarded food, would also be in much closer contact with fouling from domestic animals.

Links to climate change

The increase in infection rates might be linked to climate change with milder, wetter winters boosting the population of larvae-carrying slugs and snails.

Lungworm is not infectious to people, although other diseases that can infect your pet also pose a risk to human health.  Perhaps the most significant of these is the tick-borne Lymes Disease.  Like lungworm, the spread of Lymes in the UK might be linked to changes in the climate and the growth in travel to and from countries where such diseases are endemic.

Keeping your pet safe from lungworm and other parasites 

Whatever the reason for the increase in infection rates, prevention is better than cure, and early diagnosis with veterinary diagnostic tests is vital to effective treatment.  A word with your vet is the best way to find out all you need to keep your pet safe from lungworm and other parasites including fleas, ticks, heartworm, roundworm and tapeworms.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Egg Counts and Coccidians – Controlling Coccidiosis in Cattle and Sheep

Egg Counts and Coccidians – Controlling Coccidiosis in Cattle and Sheep

Coccidiosis is an intestinal disease caused by single-celled coccidian parasites. Though there are several species of coccidian protozoa, all must get inside the cells lining the intestines of their host to reproduce.

Coccidians spread when their eggs (oocysts) shed with their host’s faeces contaminating the food of other potential hosts. Mainly associated with poultry, infected birds suffer enteritis with blood stained diarrhoea, becoming lethargic, anaemic and showing a generally degraded condition.

Distinguishing between coccidiosis and similar symptoms

Poultry coccidians don’t infect farm mammals, nor do the cow and sheep equivalents infect chickens and waterfowl. In birds, veterinary microscopy of tissue from the characteristically swollen intestines of confirms coccidian infection. In sheep and cows, distinguishing between coccidiosis and similar symptoms of colibacilliosis, cryptospiridiosis, coronovirus, rotavirus and bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) can require further veterinary laboratory investigation.

Veterinary diagnostic kits equip busy vets with a fast and reliable answer to the question of which parasite is responsible for the observed symptoms. Vetlab’s FASTest kits provide accurate, early diagnosis even in the field allowing treatment and preventative measures to begin immediately.

Using histological staining techniques

Where coccidiosis is indicated, faecal oocyst counts can give an estimate of the level of infection. Faecal egg count flotation solutions, Ovatube detection kits and smooth, quiet veterinary centrifuges make oocyst recovery quick and clean. Veterinary microscopes and histological staining techniques support the quantitation and identification of particular coccidian species.

In recent years, histological and egg count surveys have estimated the coccidian infection rate of cattle to be about 20%. However, not all species of coccidians cause disease, and a heavy oocyte burden doesn’t always indicate a clinically significant infection.

The risk is especially high where many animals are confined

Sever coccidiosis in calves and lambs can result in life-threatening dehydration. Infection usually follows from ingestion of oocyte-infected faeces or contaminated food. The risk is especially high where many animals are confined in faeces-soiled enclosures or where young animals are grazed on land contaminated by material from hosting adults.

The exception to coccidian species specificity is Toxoplasma gondii. T.gondii reaches maturity and reproduces only in cats, where it causes more serious symptoms. Toxoplasmosis only rarely causes illness in humans and generally only in immunologically weakened dogs.

T.gondii oocysts in faeces from roaming cats can initiate abortion or foetal reabsorption in sheep. The veterinary response to this commercial risk includes vaccination, husbandry and animal-health expertise with quick detection and diagnosis with the FASTest Toxoplasmosis g diagnostic kit.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Big Five Parasite Safari: Tracking the Life that Lives On and In Your Pet

Big Five Parasite Safari: Tracking the Life that Lives On and In Your Pet

Tracking the ‘Big Five’ usually means a safari for lion, elephant, buffalo, leopard and rhino in the wilds of Africa. Your vet can help you track-down the big five pet-parasites with Veterinary Diagnostics, Microscopy and Statspin Ovatube Parasite Detection System.

On the pet parasite safari, the big five are the Intestinal Worms, Lung Worms, Heart Worms, Ticks and Fleas that love to live on and in the animals that share your home.

Heavy infestations get tangled together and block your pet’s digestive system

Intestinal worms come in a wide range of shapes and sizes. Hook Worms, Round Worms, Whip Worms and Tape Worms all effectively starve your pet from the inside out. Heavy infestations get tangled together and block your pet’s digestive system.

Lungworms start life in snails, which leave a trail of infected slime that your pets can lick off their paws. Once in your pet’s lungs, they cause congestion, difficulty breathing, coughing and exhaustion. About 10% of lungworm infections prove fatal.

Heartworms get into your pet from mosquito bites. In your pet’s heart, they block the flow of blood. Your pet’s heart has to work much harder to pump blood around the body, which can lead to heart failure.

Ticks carry the microbes that cause serious diseases including Lymes disease

Ticks and Fleas live in the fur and skin feeding on your pet’s blood. Fleas cause skin irritations and transmit the most common tapeworms that infect cats and dogs. Ticks carry the microbes that cause serious diseases including Lymes disease and the new threat, Babesiosis.

Many of the big five parasites also live in the wild animal population. Some are much more common in the wild and pet populations of other countries. Avoiding infection demands constant monitoring and protection of your pet, especially if you’re taking your dog or cat abroad for the summer. Another concern is that some of these diseases can be passed to humans.

The holiday season increases the risk of travel-related infections

Warmer weather encourages fleas and ticks, and the holiday season increases the risk of travel-related infections. Taking action to hunt down potentially deadly infestations is best begun sooner rather than later.

Your vet has all the information, products and treatments to protect your pet from the big five parasites. Veterinary diagnostic kits quickly detect parasite infections such as Lymes disease, Babesiosis. Veterinary Microscopy identifies internal worms while specialist techniques such as Statspin Ovatube Parasite Detection System will uncover the extent of any infestation discovered.

 

 

What’s Eating Your Pet? Diagnosing Dermophytosis, Ringworm and Fungal Skin Diseases with Mykodermoassay-Trio

What’s Eating Your Pet? Diagnosing Dermophytosis, Ringworm and Fungal Skin Diseases with Mykodermoassay-Trio

Ringworm is a dermophytic fungus that eats skin, hair, horn and claws in companion and commercial animals. Rapid veterinary diagnosis of dermophyte infection is the first step toward identifying, treating and eradicating fungal skin diseases.

Dermatophytosis (ringworm) is distressing to pet owners. Not a worm at all, the classic bald patches and circles of reddened skin with flaking dandruff is caused by a fungus that feeds on the keratin protein of skin, hair and claws.

In cases of dermatophytosis, the usual suspects are the Microsporum fungi: M.canis, M.gypseum, M.persicolor, the Trichophytons: T.verrucosum, T.mentagrophytes and the Epidermophytons.

Ringworm infection is spread through skin flakes from infected animals and can be transmitted to humans. These flakes carry fungal spores called conidia. Conidia are resistant to antimicrobial treatments such as chloramphenicol and cycloheximide.

The size and shape of conidia enable the veterinary laboratory to identify the species of fungus. But first, vets need a fast and reliable diagnostic test to distinguish dermophytic fungal infection from other fungi and bacteria.

Mykodermoassay-Trio features three purpose-optimised fungal growth media

Mykodermoassay-Trio features three purpose-optimised fungal growth media on a single petri dish test-plate. Divided into three sectors, the time-saving diagnostic provides SAB/SDA, DTM and ESA media in separate agar-based fungal growth environments.

The Sabouraud (SAB/SDA) agar sector encourages fungal growth while subduing the growth of bacteria that might otherwise complicate interpretation. The gel’s optical clarity enhances visual inspection and macro-identification of fungal colonies.

The Dermatophyte Test Media (DTM) inhibits bacteria and non-dermophytes by the inclusion of chloramphenicol and cycloheximide. Phenol red pH indicator confirms any alkaline waste products characteristic of dermophytic fungi with an orange to red colour change.

Clarity enhances species identification 

The Enhanced Sporulation Agar (ESA) sector, optimised for spore formation, includes the pH indicator bromophenol blue. A colour change from yellow to green-blue further supports the presence of dermophyte fungi. The gel’s clarity enhances species identification by veterinary microscopy.

Mykodermoassay-Trio provides for reliable interpretation in only 2 to 3 days. And performs equally well with samples of hair roots, dandruff, scabs and skin scrapings. Finally, a long fridge life of up to 24 months makes Mykodermoassay a convenient and cost-effective method for reassuring pet owners that their pet’s skin and fur will soon be off the menu for ringworm fungus.