Key Role For Vets In Animal Activities Welfare Act

Key Role For Vets In Animal Activities Welfare Act

The 2018 Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations, governs the trading, breeding and boarding of cats or dogs, also the hiring out of horses and the keeping or training animals for exhibition. The Act confirms veterinarians as central to animal welfare and the control of infectious kennel diseases such as Parvovirus and Canine Distemper.

Animal Welfare Protection and Regulation in One Comprehensive Act

The new law, which came into force on 1 October 2018, places all the regulations governing animal breeding, selling and boarding in England into one comprehensive Act. The new Act reinforces the legal protection of commercially housed animals from the risk of suffering and disease. This protection is particularly relevant to kennels and commercial puppy breeding establishments.

Commercial Dog Husbandry Standards Raised and Modernised

Previously, the setting and enforcing of standards in dog breeding and boarding centres was spread over a number of animal welfare acts including the Pet Animals Act 1951, Animal Boarding Establishments Act 1963, Breeding of Dogs Act 1973, Breeding of Dogs Act 1991, Breeding and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999 and latterly the 2006 Animal Welfare Act.

Registering and Licensing and Dog Breeders and Sellers

Some of the Act’s most significant features relate to health care and welfare standards in boarding kennels and dog breeding establishments. The housing of dogs and puppies under strict hygiene standards, and in accommodation that can be easily cleaned and thoroughly disinfected, is now mandatory in all commercial dog facilities.

Detailed record keeping is made mandatory and open to inspection. Records must include information on veterinary treatments, disease control, preventative healthcare and cleaning routines. The emphasis on health care and disease prevention confirms the central role of the veterinarian in the effective operation of the 2018 Act.

Online Advertising Standards and Puppy Health Aftersales Planning

The Act stipulates that breeding establishments must register their licenses with their veterinary surgeon and agree an on-going health care plan to accompany all puppies sold. Online advertising of dogs for sale must include details of the seller’s licence number, country of origin and country of residence.

The 2018 Animal Activities Welfare Act creates a legal requirement for dog breeders, boarders, trainers and traders to protect their animals from suffering and disease.

By providing expert advice relating to hygiene and husbandry, together with early diagnosis of emerging threats, Vets play a central role in the prevention and containment of canine diseases including ‘social risk’ infections such as Parvovirus and Distemper.

For further information about our diagnostic test kits Telephone: 01798 874567 or visit our website www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk

BOAS Constriction in Dogs

BOAS Constriction in Dogs

Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome

Kennel Club figures show a 3000% rise in ownership of pugs, bulldogs, French bulldogs, Boston terriers, Cavalier King Charles spaniels, Shih Tzus and boxers since 2007. Yet many owners remain unaware of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) and other health issues common to flat-faced, brachycephalic dog breeds.

Brachycephalic – meaning ‘short head’ – causes a squashing-up of the soft tissue within the dog’s nose and mouth. Folds of skin around the face further narrow and obstruct the dog’s airways causing wheezing, snorting and the struggle for breath that characterise flat-faced dogs that suffer Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome. But it’s not just breathing that’s a problem for flat-faced dog breeds.

Brachycephalic dogs can’t move enough air through their narrowed airways

In hot weather, we humans cool ourselves by sweating. Dogs can’t sweat. So when they’re too hot they have to cool down by moving more air over their moist tongues and airways. That’s why we see dogs ‘panting’ when they’re too hot. Brachycephalic dogs can’t move enough air through their narrowed airways so can easily overheat and even die in hot weather.

Flat-faced dogs still have the same number of teeth as longer nosed breeds. Fitting all 42 teeth into a shortened mouth causes overcrowded teeth to overlap making teeth and gums harder to keep clean and free from decay and disease.

High risk of conjunctivitis, ulcers and even sight-loss

Skin-folds around the face provide a hiding place for fleas, disease-carrying mites and other irritants that can cause hair loss and fungal skin infections. Shortened muzzles cause the eyes to stand out more allowing the thin film of protective moisture to dry more quickly risking conjunctivitis, ulcers and even sight-loss.

Selective breeding has so effectively accelerated the evolution of the larger head-size of flat-faced dogs that other, naturally evolving, parts of the anatomy haven’t been able to keep up. Brachycephalic bitches frequently require a caesarean section to deliver their pups. Pet charity, The Blue Cross, report that more than 80% of English Bulldog and French Bulldog pups are delivered by C-section births.

Pressure for change

Pressure for change is coming from a number of concerned sources. The British Veterinary Association (BVA) and the Campaign for the Responsible Use of Flat Faced Animals (CRUFFA) have begun educating advertising agencies against using flat-nosed dogs in ad campaigns. The more extreme breed standards are under review by The Kennel Club and other international breed regulators.

But the most effective pressure may yet prove to be economic. The increased risk of corneal ulcers and breathing problems in brachycephalic breeds means that owners are likely to have to pay more when insuring flat-faced breeds, with Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) and related conditions possibly excluded from their insurance cover.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Lower Lambing Season Losses

Lower Lambing Season Losses

Fast Field Test for E.coli- K99 Pathogen

The first lambs of the lambing season are here and full of the joys of the spring yet to arrive. Delivering as early as the second week in January, the most productive ewes will give birth to twins or even triplets, with quadruplets not uncommon and the occasional delivery of quintuplets.

Large numbers of new-borns fail to thrive

Sadly, the arrival of so many newborn lambs over a relatively short time span can result in a large number of new-borns failing to thrive early, sicken or die. In well managed flocks, mortality among newborn lambs is reported to be as low as 5%, but loss rates can be as high as 20% in extreme circumstances. Every lamb lost is damaging to the economic survival of Britain’s highly pressured sheep farms.

High mortality among newborn commercial animals

One all too common cause of high mortality among newborn commercial animals is pathogenic E.coli infection. A particularly pathogenic strain of the common gut bacteria, Escherichia coli, is known in veterinary laboratories as E.coli-K99. The K99 tag refers to a molecular feature on the surface of the E.coli bacteria that differentiates it from other, less harmful strains. The feature effectively disguises the invader from the host animal’s protective system of search-and-destroy ‘phagocyte’ cells that normally seek out and engulf unwelcome bacteria rendering them harmless. Unrecognised by infection-fighting phagocytes, the multiplying bacteria infiltrate the host animal’s digestive system causing severe tissue damage and resulting in dangerous fluid loss through uncontrollable diarrhoea.

Identifying pathogenic E.coli infection

Veterinary laboratories have exploited the K99 marker as a means of identifying pathogenic E.coli infection, allowing treatment with antibiotics that can also identify, target and destroy bacteria with the K99 antigen.

The ability to quickly and confidently identify K99 E.coli is vital because severe diarrhoea and dehydration is deadly not only in newborn lambs, but also in calves and piglets. Diarrhoea in newborn animals can have multiple causes, including infection with enterotoxic Rotavirus, Coronavirus, Cryptosporidium, Salmonella and Giardia, so it can be difficult to make a quick diagnosis based on symptoms alone.

Rapid and reliable – all-in-one veterinary field test

Vetlab Supplies FASTest E.coli-K99 Strip is the genuine go-anywhere veterinary field-test for E.coli-K99 in lamb, calf and piglet faeces. Rapid and reliable, the all-in-one kit requires no refrigerated storage or laboratory equipment to produce a quick, clear-cut, colour change diagnosis of K99 infection.

FASTest E.coli-K99 Strip, and other Vetlab Supplies veterinary diagnostic kits provide timely and reliable support to the veterinary examination of animals suffering pathogenic digestive tract infections.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

The Mating Game – Breeding Assistance Dogs Isn’t A Game of Chance

The Mating Game – Breeding Assistance Dogs Isn’t A Game of Chance

The breeding of assistance dogs, under the supervision of the UK Guide Dogs National Breeding Centre. Each mating is carefully planned to guarantee the health and welfare of each breeding bitch and their potential pups.

Most assistance dog pups are born in the homes of volunteer puppy carers though many are born at the UK Guide Dogs NBC in Leamington Spa. Pups born at the centre are introduced to the sights and sounds of the domestic environment – including TV, radio, washing machine and vacuum cleaner noise, by teams of volunteers. Breeding never begins before a bitch is 19 months old and the breeding career ends after seven years.

Avoiding consecutive pregnancies

Great care is taken to avoid consecutive pregnancies giving a bitch time to recover from the stresses of pregnancy and motherhood before any further mating. Breeding bitches give birth to no more than 4 litters and never more than 5. A fifth litter is only allowed under exceptional circumstances and only with veterinary approval.

Planning the breeding of assistance dogs means breeders must know when a bitch is most fertile, known as ‘in oestrus’. The oestrus cycles of bitches that live mostly outdoors is influenced by seasonal, environmental factors including changes in day length. Bitches ready to mate and conceive are referred to as ‘in season’ and show behavioural changes described as their being ‘on heat’.

Recently, researchers from the Universities of Cambridge and Nottingham, together with NBC staff, studied the oestrus cycles of breeding bitches kept mostly indoors. They found that, sheltered from seasonal variations, the number bitches ‘on heat’ at any one time was evenly spread throughout the year.

Breading centres require accurate knowledge

Breeding healthy puppies, maintaining the welfare of breeding bitches and efficiently manage the resources of a breeding centre requires accurate knowledge of when a bitch is about to come into season. In the absence of the defined ‘breeding season’ of outdoor and wild dog populations, breeders and managers must rely on other indicators of bitches breeding condition.

Monitoring changes in the bitch’s hormone levels is the most accurate way to predict ovulation and the best time for mating. TARGET Canine Ovulation Diagnostic Test Kit measures the level of the hormone progesterone, enabling breeders to predict the best time for conception – the period 5-6 days after the initial rise in Progesterone.

Following mating, pregnancy can be confirmed and monitored with the FASTest RELAXIN test; especially useful in excluding pseudopregnancy (false pregnancy) and where there are worries about any possible spontaneous abortion.

Further testing with TARGET Canine Ovulation Diagnostic Test Kit toward the completion of pregnancy will help breeders of assistance dogs prepare for the arrival of the litter, and to martial their resources quickly and efficiently.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Kennel Club’s 3 Things Not To Do When Choosing Your New Puppy

Kennel Club’s 3 Things Not To Do When Choosing Your New Puppy

Over the 2016-17 Christmas fortnight of 20 December to 2 January, Dog’s Trust received 127 unwanted dogs and puppies – a 54% increase above the figure for the same period in 2015-16.

More than 300 animals given shelter

Over the whole of the festive season, the charity gave shelter to more than 300 animals but also received an average of 70 calls a day from people wanting to give up their dogs in the weeks immediately before and after Christmas.

The Dog’s Trust launched its ‘‘A dog is for life, not just for Christmas’ not just for Christmas’ for the 1978 festive season. Back then, the charity was known by the more formal title of The National Canine Defence League.

The slogan, created by Clarissa Baldwin OBE, chief executive of the Dogs Trust since 1986, first hit the streets of Britain as a sticker campaign for 20,000 car windows and bumpers. Since then, the charity’s strap-line has gained an entry in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations and is now a registered trademark.

Online sales provide unscrupulous puppy dealers with the anonymity they need

In the 70s, many high street pet shops still sold puppies and kittens to casual buyers. Although this aspect of the pet trade has largely disappeared from the UK, it has been replaced by the practice of buying pups through online ads and social media contacts.

The internet can be worse for pups than a pet shop. Online sales provide unscrupulous puppy dealers with the anonymity they need. Reliable breeders will want to promote, not hide, themselves and will be more than keen to let you know who and where they are.

Reputable breeders are usually enthusiasts for the breed rather than the sale mostly specialising in one breed. They’ll be happy to provide you with pedigree and vaccination certificates – including distemper, parvovirus, kennel cough, leptospirosis and parainfluenza, respond positively to your requests to meet the pup more than once and even return your purchase if the new arrival proves unsuited to your lifestyle.

Choosing a registered breeder 

Choosing where to get your puppy is just as important as choosing what sort of puppy you want. You shouldn’t be bounced into a panic buy – especially at Christmas. If you know a highly regarded, Kennel Club Assured breeder, be prepared to on their waiting list. And always stick to the club’s 3 big don’ts: never buy a puppy from a pet shop, never pick your puppy up from a meeting in a car park or motorway service station and never buy a puppy because the seller made you feel like some sort of rescuer.

To be sure you’re doing the best for your new canine companion, for yourself and for everyone devoted to dog health and welfare. Make sure your puppy comes from a registered breeder such as a Kennel Club Assured Breeder.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567

Planning for a Happy Event – TARGET Canine Ovulation Test Kit

Planning for a Happy Event – TARGET Canine Ovulation Test Kit

Successful dog breeding requires perfect timing. Bitches come to their breeding peak only about twice a year. So knowing when your bitch is ‘in season’ or ‘on heat’ is essential whether you’re mating her with a specially chosen dog, or artificially inseminating with semen.

For as long as the breeding of dogs has been deliberately managed, breeders have wanted to know the days when a bitch is most likely to conceive. Breeders have watched their bitches for physical signs including bleeding and discharge from the vulva (the reproductive opening) or just when the animal became receptive to the approaches of male dogs.

Microscopic examination of samples from the bitch’s vulva also gave important clues to a bitch’s reproductive state. Cells that line the birth canal change their shape and appearance as the time of ovulation draws near. At ovulation, eggs are released from the bitch’s ovaries to be fertilised by sperm in the semen of a male dog. This needs to happen two to three days after ovulation or the opportunity could be lost for another 6 months.

Monitoring the changes in hormone levels

The time of ovulation is governed and controlled by a balance of hormones secreted into the bloodstream. While these other predictors of ovulation are useful guides, a more direct and precise method would be to monitor the changes in hormone levels.

One of the key hormones in canine ovulation is the hormone `progesterone`. This is made in the ovaries and detected in blood samples. Progesterone levels in bitches 2 to 4 days before the ovaries release their eggs.

Rising progesterone levels and imminent ovulation

The TARGET Canine Ovulation Kit is a simple all-in-one box method for predicting canine ovulation from a bitch’s blood progesterone level. Pre-ovulation, the kit returns a bright blue result. A pale blue colour means quickly rising progesterone levels and imminent ovulation. A clear white result, normally 2 days after ovulation, indicates the ideal time for successful mating or insemination.

High progesterone levels are maintained by the placenta if fertilisation occurs, but fall back to their low pre-ovulation state if the eggs are not fertilised and no pregnancy follows. High progesterone levels during pregnancy maintain the blood supply to the placentae feeding the growing pups, and prevent premature contractions of the uterus (womb).

About 58 to 60 days into a bitch’s pregnancy, the progesterone levels begin to allow for contractions and birth. If there have been complications, and a C-section birth seems likely, then tracking the falling levels with The TARGET Canine Ovulation Kit will help determine the optimal time for C-section delivery.

What’s Breed Got To Do With It? 25 Years Of The Dangerous Dogs Act

What’s Breed Got To Do With It? 25 Years Of The Dangerous Dogs Act

25 years on from the introduction of The Dangerous Dogs Act, researchers from the Battersea Dogs and Cats Home have published a report claiming there’s little evidence to suggest that the controversial law has reduced the frequency of dog attacks in the UK.

The 1991 Act outlawed four dog breeds; the Pit Bull Terrier, Dogo Argentino, Japanese Tosa and the Fila Braziliero. However, according to the Home’s Chief Executive, the Act has failed by: “focusing on how a dog looks rather than on anything it has done or the actions of the owner”.

In Battersea’s survey of 215 UK dog behaviour experts, 74% said that breed was at most only slightly relevant to whether or not a dog could be judged dangerous. Further, the four named breeds were not the most likely to be involved in aggressive behaviour.

30 dog attack fatalities including 16 children over the life of the Act

Against the 25 Pit Bull Terriers put to sleep by the charity in the last year, the NHS recorded 7,227 dog bite admissions in the same period – a 6% year on year increase, with 30 dog attack fatalities including 16 children over the life of the Act.

Calling for the repeal of the Act, Battersea argues that a law based solely on an animal’s breed or appearance does not enhance the protection of the public from dangerous dogs.

Citing the Home’s reception of 91 Bull Terrier type dogs in the last year alone, Battersea also claims that the Act has failed to deal with the rearing and sale of the breed that triggered the Law, instead of pushing the trade in dogs of this type underground.

Continued care by the owner is no less important than a good start with the breeder

Of the experts consulted, 73% thought the treatment given by the breeder more significant than the breed itself, while 86% highlighted the treatment given by the dog’s owner as more likely to influence a dog’s aggressive nature than its appearance or type.

The vast majority of responsible dog breeders, dealers and owners do show themselves willing and capable of giving the lifelong behavioural, emotional and veterinary care a dog needs. If a dog of any breed is to behave acceptably in a family and in a wider social setting, then continued care by the owner is no less important than a good start with the breeder.

For a good start, all dogs should receive vaccinations for the common dog diseases Parvovirus, Parainfluenza, Distemper, Adenovirus and Leptospirosis. Attentive, ongoing care will spot any early symptoms of illness or disease which your vet will be able to quickly diagnose with a Veterinary Diagnostic Test Kit, recommending the best treatment to put your dog on the road to recovery – whatever the breed!

Year Round Or Block Calving: Balancing Herd Economics and Health

Year Round Or Block Calving: Balancing Herd Economics and Health

High infrastructure and feed costs, combined with continuing low milk prices, mean dairy farmers are moving toward block calving to increase their productivity – but at what cost?

In block calving, all the cows in a herd have their calves over a block of just a few weeks. This means a short but intense period of labour for farm workers, rather than the longer but less fraught activity when a herd’s calving is spread evenly through the year. Dairy farmers will plan their block calving for spring or autumn, and each season has its own set of advantages and draw backs.

Block calving can help farmers make the most efficient use of expensive infrastructure and plan for when pasture and silage is most economically available. However, it can also mean that an entire herd is temporarily out of milk production with the farm’s entire calving investment for a whole year resting on just a few weeks.

Calving in the spring or the autumn 

Whether spring or autumn calving, a successful season will see a large number of new and vulnerable calves concentrated in a small area ripe for the growth and spread of pathogens. There are two particular diseases that place every new born calf at risk.

Cryptosporidiosis and coccidiosis are major diseases of new born calves causing debilitating weight loss, diarrhoea and even death. According to figures from the UK Government’s Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA, 2012), 38% of cattle enteric diseases, isolated by veterinary laboratories, were identified as cryptosporidiosis, while another 18% could be attributed to coccidiosis.

Both diseases begin through the contamination of food, water or bedding with the infected faeces. In the case of cryptosporidiosis, the infective agent – the parasite’s eggs or ‘oocysts’, can persist in bedding for several months and even, for coccidiosis, from one year to the next.

Infective oocysts are resistant to most disinfectants and cleaning agents

The damage caused by infection is both long-lasting and irreversible. Licensed treatments are available but, as yet, there is no complete ‘cure’. Because infective oocysts are resistant to most disinfectants and cleaning agents, efficient management and constant vigilance are the only safeguards against infection and re-infection.

Clean housing, bedding and ventilation together, with raising feeding troughs above the ground, will reduce the chance of faecal contamination. A policy of low-density stocking supported by a regime of thorough cleaning and disinfecting immediately before and after the calving season, will also help limit the chances of re-infection year on year.

Whether your dairy farm is just coming out of its spring calving, or preparing for autumn calving, diagnostic testing of suspect animals now for cryptosporidiosis might help isolate a source of widening infection even before it begins.

Canine Infertility and Abortion – Keeping Brucella Canis in Check

Canine Infertility and Abortion – Keeping Brucella Canis in Check

Breeders of pedigree dogs depend on the health and fertility of their breeding animals. Maintaining a kennel free of Brucella canis prevents early abortion and infertility. A programme of regular screening, supported by MegaCor FASTest® BRUCELLA C. Veterinary Diagnostic Test Kits, provide the essential first step to creating a Brucellosis prevention programme.

Everyone loves puppies

Everyone loves puppies. And everyone loves the anticipation of their healthy arrival. But for breeders of pedigree dogs and kennel owners, puppies represent much more than bundles of fun and frolics. The loss of a pedigree litter can have serious economic consequences for a kennel or breeder, and the loss of fertile breeding stock can have implications for the survival of a genetic line or even an entire breed.

Infection with the bacterium Brucella canis is most noticeable – and most distressing, when a litter of long awaited puppies is aborted, usually in the last two weeks of pregnancy, or die shortly after birth. Less obvious are the signs that a valued animal is a carrier and likely to infect other animals. Not all pregnancies, prematurely ended by B. canis, show up as abortions or puppies that die. A pregnant bitch can re-absorb the placentae and foetuses that die early in pregnancy. Without reference to a reliable veterinary diagnostic test for B.canis, she may appear to be infertile rather than dangerously infected and infective.

Brucella canis spreads through contact

It’s not just bitches that might carry B.canis. Male dogs too can carry the bacterium, in their reproductive organs, resulting in a defective and low sperm count with a serious effect on their fertility. Brucella canis spreads through contact not only with diseased birth material, but also through other discharges and secretions from infected dogs and bitches. Brucella canis can also pass to humans, with those handling aborted material especially at risk of infection.

Regular screening is important to maintain a disease free and fertile breeding stock

Screening with Vetlab’s FASTest® BRUCELLA C. Veterinary Diagnostic Test Kit is the trusted method for cost-effective B.Canis monitoring. The 20-minute test utilises specific antibody technology which seeks out any Brucella bacteria and attaches to it, creating a coloured complex. The whole test takes place in a small, plastic strip that gives a clear-cut positive or ‘all-clear’ negative result supported by a ‘control’ test to show that the kit is performing correctly.

With no reliable and economically viable treatment available, it’s most important that kennels and breeders have their animals regularly and continually screened for the presence of B.canis to maintain a healthy, disease free and fertile breeding stock.

 

Combatting Puppy Farming and the Infectious Diseases they Spread

Combatting Puppy Farming and the Infectious Diseases they Spread

A Shadowy & Cruel Market Place

Fuelled by the greed and desire to make cash, unscrupulous breeders continue to breed litter after litter of puppies with no regard for their health or welfare.  The sharp increase of illegal trading of pets across Europe and the UK is spiralling out of control.  The steady increase of parvovirus diagnostic test kit sales in the UK, just confirms the problem. What’s being done, and how can it ever be stamped out? With difficulty!  This horrible trade will never be stopped despite the continuing efforts and dedication of many societies throughout the world.  The Dogs Trust and Battersea Dogs Home always spring to mind, as they are invariably at the forefront of these ongoing issues, and thank goodness they are!

Proposed Animal Health Law

EU policy makers are backing an initiative which could ensure that all breeders and sellers will be registered from 2020. That seems a long way off, so just how many more sick animals will be illegally sold and traded in that time? More than any of us can possibly imagine – and will any type of law ever stop this trading? You’ve just got to feel for the legitimate breeders who work so hard to ensure their animals are healthy, vaccinated and cared for properly until they reach their new homes.

Canine Parvovirus – Top Of The Agenda

Vetlab Supplies have supported charities for over 30 years and have a wealth of knowledge about infectious diseases and diagnostic test kits. Parvovirus is one of the main problems that this illegal puppy-trading brings with it.  Canine Parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness and worse.  There is no doubt that illegal puppy farms/kennels can be rife with this virus, which can even survive on inanimate objects such as shoes, bowls, and all types of flooring.

Puppies and young dogs are most susceptible to the virus especially when they are not vaccinated. It’s a well-known fact that many dogs sold on through puppy farms are not vaccinated and many thousands of unsuspecting owners find that the new addition to their family quickly becomes sick and are subsequently confirmed positive for canine parvovirus.   Canine Parvovirus is one of the most common and deadly causes of canine viral gastroenteritis in the world.

Charitable Discounts From Vetlab Supplies

The Fastest Canine Parvo diagnostic test kit is based on a lateral-flow principle. It is a non-refrigerated test kit with a long shelf-life and a simple 2-step procedure which gives you reliable results in under 5 minutes.   The precise diagnosis of this infection enables the veterinarian to apply the immediate treatment and to introduce quarantine measures for infected animals.  The Fastest Parvo Card is very reasonably priced, accurate and available at charity discounts to all veterinarians working for charities/welfare centres and shelters.  Vetlab Supplies also offer many other veterinary supplies at charitable discounts – see what they can do for you.

To find out more about our large range of veterinary diagnostic test kits visit our website: www.vetlabsupplies.co.uk or Telephone: 01798 874567